Saturday, April 10, 2021

Book Discussion: Khirbet Khizeh (Sun, Apr 18)

 

Khirbet Khizeh cover
(Available via paperback and Kindle)

About Khirbet Khizeh by S. Yizhar

From the Publisher:

It's 1948 and the Arab villagers of Khirbet Khizeh are about to be violently expelled from their homes. A young Israeli soldier who is on duty that day finds himself battling on two fronts: with the villagers and, ultimately, with his own conscience.

Published just months after the founding of the state of Israel and the end of the 1948 war, the novella Khirbet Khizeh was an immediate sensation when it first appeared. Since then, the book has continued to challenge and disturb, even finding its way onto the school curriculum in Israel. The various debates it has prompted would themselves make Khirbet Khizeh worth reading, but the novella is much more than a vital historical document: it is also a great work of art. Yizhar's haunting, lyrical style and charged view of the landscape are in many ways as startling as his wrenchingly honest view of modern Israel's primal scene.

Considered a modern Hebrew masterpiece, Khirbet Khizeh is an extraordinary and heartbreaking book that is destined to be a classic of world literature.

Discussion Details

Join us by Zoom for an interesting discussion of Yizhar's book Khirbet Khizeh.


Time:  Sunday, April 18, at 3:00 p.m. Central 
Zoom Link: https://zoom.us/j/974051878
Password:  Zoom may ask you for a password;
    email Ed, Susan, or bethshalomauburn@gmail.com for the password
Meeting ID:  (to type into Zoom if the link isn’t working): 974 051 878

Read about us and follow us on Facebook. Join us for regular events (Friday services, Torah study, men's breakfasts) and special events (High Holy Days, holiday celebrations, book discussions, special programs, and visiting rabbis, educators, and speakers). Parents, contact us to learn about our religious school.

Friday, April 9, 2021

Show & Tell: Documents from a Member's Family in Nazi-Occupied Europe (Sun, Apr 11)

Closeup of Passport Border Stamp
Passport Border Stamp

Update: Recording of the presentation
(password protected)

When and Where: On Sunday, April 11 at 3:00 p.m. on Zoom. 

The direct link to the presentation is in members and friends emails. If you are not on our contact list and would like to attend, please email us.

What: One of our members (KP) will present and talk about the few documents saved from her family’s experience in Nazi-occupied Austria and Czechoslovakia. These are documents she has never shared completely before, not even with her family. They tell something about the experience of her parents in Vienna and that of a cousin and his family in the Moravian-Silesian region in eastern Czechoslovakia. They span the years 1938 to 1941 and illustrate events from the annexation of Austria into the German empire and Nazi occupation of Czechloslovakia. 

Duration: KP's presentation will begin at 3:00 p.m. and last approximately 30 minutes, after which there will be time for questions and discussion. 

Future Events? With this event, the Cultural Arts Committee will start what we hope will be a series of Zoom get-togethers entitled “Show and Tell.” We want to create a way for members of the Beth Shalom community to share experiences and stories about their own or their family’s experience as Jews. Items shared can include ritual or other artifacts and objects, photographs, stories, or anything else you would like to share with the community.

Friday, December 11, 2020

Book Discussion: Glikl: Memoirs 1691-1719 by Glikl and editor/translators (Thu, Jan 21)

Glikl: Memoirs 1689-1719
This book discussion is sponsored by our Hadassah discussion group.

About Glikl: Memoirs 1691-1719 (Tauber Institute for the Study of European Jewry)  by Glikl,  Chava Turniansky (Editor, Introduction), Sara Friedman (Translator)

(Available via paperback, hardcover, and Kindle)

From the Publisher:

“My dear children, I write this for you in case your dear children or grandchildren come to you one of these days, knowing nothing of their family. For this reason I have set this down for you here in brief, so that you might know what kind of people you come from.”

These words from the memoirs Glikl bas Leib wrote in Yiddish between 1691 and 1719 shed light on the life of a devout and worldly woman. Writing initially to seek solace in the long nights of her widowhood, Glikl continued to record the joys and tribulations of her family and community in an account unique for its impressive literary talents and strong invocation of self. Through intensely personal recollections, Glikl weaves stories and traditional tales that express her thoughts and beliefs. While influenced by popular Yiddish moral literature, Glikl’s frequent use of first person and the significance she assigns her own life experience set the work apart. Informed by fidelity to the original Yiddish text, this authoritative new translation is fully annotated to explicate Glikl’s life and times, offering readers a rich context for appreciating this classic work.

Discussion Details

Join us by Zoom for an engaging discussion of Glikl's Memoirs

Time:  Thursday, January 21, at 7:00 p.m. Central 
Zoom Link: https://zoom.us/j/974051878
Password:  Zoom may ask you for a password;
    email Ed, Susan, or bethshalomauburn@gmail.com for the password
Meeting ID:  (to type into Zoom if the link isn’t working): 974 051 878



Read about us and follow us on Facebook. Join us for regular events (Friday services, Torah study, men's breakfasts) and special events (High Holy Days, holiday celebrations, book discussions, special programs, and visiting rabbis, educators, and speakers). Parents, contact us to learn about our religious school.

Book Discussion: Waking Lions by Gundar-Goshen (Sun, Feb 7)

 

(Available via paperback, hardcover, Kindle, & audiobook)

About Waking Lions by Ayelet Gundar-Goshen


From the Publisher:

After one night's deadly mistake, a man will go to any lengths to save his family and his reputation.

Neurosurgeon Eitan Green has the perfect life -- married to a beautiful police officer and father of two young boys. Then, speeding along a deserted moonlit road after an exhausting hospital shift, he hits someone. Seeing that the man, an African migrant, is beyond help, he flees the scene.

When the victim's widow knocks at Eitan's door the next day, holding his wallet and divulging that she knows what happened, Eitan discovers that her price for silence is not money. It is something else entirely, something that will shatter Eitan's safe existence and take him into a world of secrets and lies he could never have anticipated.

Waking Lions is a gripping, suspenseful, and morally devastating drama of guilt and survival, shame and desire from a remarkable young author on the rise.


Discussion Details

Join us by Zoom for an interesting discussion of Gundar-Goshen's book Waking Lions.


Time:  Sunday, February 7, at 3:00 p.m. Central 
Zoom Link: https://zoom.us/j/974051878
Password:  Zoom may ask you for a password;
    email Ed, Susan, or bethshalomauburn@gmail.com for the password
Meeting ID:  (to type into Zoom if the link isn’t working): 974 051 878




Read about us and follow us on Facebook. Join us for regular events (Friday services, Torah study, men's breakfasts) and special events (High Holy Days, holiday celebrations, book discussions, special programs, and visiting rabbis, educators, and speakers). Parents, contact us to learn about our religious school.

Friday, October 23, 2020

Book Discussion: Wandering Dixie (Sun, Nov 15)

 

Wandering Dixie cover


(Available via paperback and Kindle)

About Wandering Dixie: Dispatches from the Lost Jewish South by Sue Eisenfeld


From the Publisher:

Sue Eisenfeld is a Yankee by birth, a Virginian by choice, an urbanite who came to love the rural South, a Civil War buff, and a nonobservant Jewish woman. In Wandering Dixie, she travels to nine states, uncovering how the history of Jewish southerners converges with her personal story and the region’s complex, conflicted present. In the process, she discovers the unexpected ways that race, religion, and hidden histories intertwine.

From South Carolina to Arkansas, she explores the small towns where Jewish people once lived and thrived. She visits the site of her distant cousin and civil rights activist Andrew Goodman’s murder during 1964’s Freedom Summer. She also talks with the only Jews remaining in some of the “lost” places, from Selma to the Mississippi Delta to Natchitoches, and visits areas with no Jewish community left—except for an old temple or overgrown cemetery. Eisenfeld follows her curiosity about Jewish Confederates and casts an unflinching eye on early southern Jews’ participation in slavery. Her travels become a journey of revelation about our nation’s fraught history and a personal reckoning with the true nature of America.


Discussion Details

Join us by Zoom for an engaging discussion of Sue Eisenfeld's book Wandering Dixie.


Time:  Sunday, November 15, at 3:00 p.m. Central 
Zoom Link: https://zoom.us/j/974051878
Password:  Zoom may ask you for a password;
    email Ed, Susan, or bethshalomauburn@gmail.com for the password
Meeting ID:  (to type into Zoom if the link isn’t working): 974 051 878




Read about us and follow us on Facebook. Join us for regular events (Friday services, Torah study, men's breakfasts) and special events (High Holy Days, holiday celebrations, book discussions, special programs, and visiting rabbis, educators, and speakers). Parents, contact us to learn about our religious school.

Thursday, September 24, 2020

Reminders leading up to Yom Kippur (beginning Sun, Sep 27)

Please join our Yom Kippur services with Rabbi Kalfus via Zoom; as always, no tickets required. Visit the schedule for times. 

(And join us before then for Friday services—Zoom only this week—and Torah study on Saturday.)

Rabbi Kalfus and Phyllis Meyers are looking forward to seeing you on Yom Kippur, as are other members of the community. Everyone will see your camera's view if you join with video, and we hope you do! However, we know the day is long and that not everyone can fast. If you eat, please remember to turn off your camera to make the fast easier for those who are fasting.

Shana Tova! 

Computer and food: Turn off your camera if eating



10 Minutes of Torah from the URJ